Recently, a collegiate basketball game displayed that the starting forwards scored 41 of the team’s 66 points, 62% of the total points. Without seeing the game, one might imagine that these individuals were either dominating post players or excellent shooters.

Numbers don’t lie, but they don’t tell the whole story either. 

It is often the actions that cannot be quantified that lead a team to success. Team success is a direct result of superior execution of its members. The most cohesive teams consist of individuals who have a strong understanding of their roles in order to make the entire team better. What this collegiate team successfully did, was execute the “Pick & Roll.” 

Every offensive possession by this team was centered on the Pick & Roll. As their point guard approached the 3-point arc, a pick was set on the defender to provide the ball carrier with space. This triggered the motion offense where the defenders struggled to maintain their man-to-man defensive coverage. Several crisp passes, or a back-screen later, and the forward who set the pick usually found the ball in his hands with a simple lay-up.

Each player must “buy in” to the game plan for the Pick & Roll to work.

(check out here 8 negatives of the pick & roll). Players must make the efforts necessary to execute the critical actions of success that may even go individually unnoticed in the box score.  If the play breaks down enough, it can cause a lack of trust in the system or the teammates, which is why complete “buy-in” is paramount! Remember though, that the best number that doesn’t lie is the “w.”

 Brain FosterAuthor: Brian Foster is a graduate student in Sport Psychology. His thesis is focused on Optimism and Psychological Momentum in Sport. He can be reached at bfoster@bsu.edu

 

 

Rob Bell revised slide3Dr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology coach. DRB & Associates based in Indianapolis works with professional athletes & corporate athletes, coaches, and teams building their Mental Toughness.  His 2nd book is titled The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness. Follow on twitter @drrobbell  or contact drrobbell@drrobbell.com

Check out the new film & e-book, NO FEAR: A simple guide to mental toughness .

 

simple way to remove anxiety for athletesThe question surfaces often by coaches and parents:

“How can I help some of my athletes relax before big (games, meets, races, etc.)”

Tom Petty said it best, “the waiting is the hardest part.”  It’s the amount of time to actually “think” before a competition that causes the most stress. Since, the moment itself provides enough excitement and nervousness, it is a matter of athletes NOT getting “over-hyped” rather than being “under-hyped.”

Here’s how to relieve tension for athletes…

walkedtrinityww.com/files/

Aside from actual mental training and mental toughness that focuses on pre-competition strategies, there actually is a super-fun way to help ease the tension of a team. When I am with teams at ALL levels, I’ll use breaks to play the old reliable “rock, paper, scissors.”

It is easy, fun, fast, and best of all, competitive. All athletes hate to lose, so they can switch their focus to winning a game of RPS rather easily. These moments have scored big points with getting their mind away from the upcoming competition. But more importantly, I also use the quick game to help them with their focus, confidence, and to ease the tension.

Dr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates is based in Indianapolis.  Some clients have included: University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. Check out the most recent book on Mental Toughness- Don’t Should on Your Kids: Build Their Mental Toughness   

A young kung fu student travels to meet a renowned sensei… The student tells the master that he wants to train under him to become a powerful samurai and asked “how long it would take”?

online payday loans california

The master tells him it will take 10 years of training. Unsatisfied, the student says that he will work harder than any student, to which the master replies, that it will take 20 years now. Again unsatisfied, the student says he will train harder day and night. This time the master replies, now it would take 30 years.

The confused student asks the master why it will take longer the harder he works. The sensei responds, “The answer is clear, when one eye is fixed upon your destination, there is only one eye left with which to find the way.”Are you framing your work ONLY in terms of the end goal? When we do this, we lose part of that focus we need to accomplish our goals.

Understanding the process and experiencing the journey it takes to reach a goal, is what helps us stay committed to our work. Don’t allow the destination to become more important than the journey.

About the Author: Will Drumright is an Associate of DRB. He works with athletes of all ages, especially good one’s. He can be reached at  wcdrumright@gmail.com or twitter  @wcdrummy15 

An A.D. that I met with recently discussed how one of their best basketball players always played safe. On one hand, the point guard made few mistakes and played consistent. However, the point guard also held back and never “took over a game.” They lacked mental toughness… 

At a swim meet yesterday, I spoke with a swimming coach who remarked how one of his swimmers never “went for it” and reached her potential.

The “Safe” athlete is the new normal.

From helmets used in soccer, face-masks for “fielding,” and mouth guards galore, we are overly concerned for our athletes “safety.” In some cases, this is justified. However, when it comes to playing our best, “safe” doesn’t cut it.

A “safe” athlete is afraid of messing up. They know that they can play it “safe” and not get judged too harshly, or risk defeat through their play. The motivation to put oneself “out there” simply does not outweigh the risk of defeat.

At some point, these athletes were judged too harshly on their mistakes and they were not allowed to fail! In turn, the athlete quickly discerned to just “not mess up.” The reality is that sport and life is all about failure, we are going to have setbacks more than we are going to win, and this is the process.

A huge part of the game is the unknown, the feeling of putting yourself against another of equal or more ability and seeing what happens. This feeling is nervousness, excitement, and anticipation. It is uncomfortable, but the only way to achieve success is to be comfortable, being uncomfortable.

Unless that athlete is allowed to fail and know they are “safe” OUTSIDE  of the sport, they won’t risk it, and put it on the line IN their sport.

The A.D. had a heart to heart with the athlete, and told the point guard she wasn’t reaching her potential and that she would later regret it. That one talk changed everything and now the point guard plays with a passion unafraid to fail.

“Show me an athlete who is afraid to look bad, and I’ll show you an athlete you can beat every time.” Unknown

 

Dr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates is based in Indianapolis.  Some clients have included: University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens.

Check out the most recent book on Mental Toughness- Don’t Should on Your Kids: Build Their Mental Toughness