breathing tips on how to wear a mask
breathing tips on how to wear a mask

One of The Simplest Breathing Tips On How To Wear A Mask 


Masks are going to be the norm for awhile.  Hey, if that's what it takes to save lives, resume sports, school, and business activity, then I'm in. Remember, It is what it is = nothing good has happened.  However, there can be some breathing issues when wearing a mask. Breathing has now become more important than ever because, we are now made more aware of it. It can get hot under those masks, glasses fog up, we feel the need to "catch our breath" and we even can start to hyperventilate.  Since wearing it is so new, here are the most important tips on how to wear a mask. 
  1. Breathe through your nose
Mouth breathing is not natural, yet 25-50% of us do it. Mostly, we mouth breathe while exercising, but for some folks, it is also at night.  The myth is that the more air we breathe, the more air we get. However, in reality, almost 75% of the oxygen we breathe in, we let out as well. We simply breathe too much.  Mouth breathing makes it harder to offload the oxygen to the muscles and organs it needs.  Once a mask goes over our mouth and nose, there may be a natural fear response of not getting enough oxygen. Thus, it's a natural reaction to try and breathe through the mouth to take in more oxygen.  Although, the need to breathe is not dictated by the need for oxygen but actually the need for increased carbon dioxide. CO2 gets a bad rap, like the rat. However...
Carbon dioxide is not just waste or a byproduct– you need a balance of both, carbon dioxide and oxygen. 
The nose is the first line of defense against viruses, bacteria, and other junk. The nose helps slow down our breathing and produces nitric oxide which plays an essential role in filtering and humidifying the air so the oxygen is absorbed better. One also gets almost 25% more oxygen when breathing through the nose compared to the mouth.  So, why don't we do it? Because, we've simply never been taught. 
        2. Practice breath work  I started breathing only through my nose on long runs. It is the best ever. It is much more controlled and I can get in the zone and rhythm more easily.  Now, it is much harder for me to only breath through my nose during intense workout sessions though, which is why it takes practice. It takes more practice to breath effectively while a mask is on as well.  Here are your practice tips on how to wear a mask by focusing on nasal breathing. Download our audio breathing script

We utilize rectangle breathing to maximize our patterns and this audio will guide you through it. It is perfect to practice during your transitions in life and/or to make it part of your everyday routine
What we want to do with ease, we must first do with diligence. 
Give your new breathing a few weeks and let us know how your breathing with the mask has improved.  Just these two tips on how to wear a mask by learning how to breathe more effectively and efficiently will result in major improvements. 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

physical distancing and mental health

physical distancing and mental health


Worried About Your Teen's Physical Distancing and Mental Health? Check the L.A.B


Social distancing isn't cool, we need each other and we need interaction. Physical distancing on the other hand is warranted. Examining exactly how physical distancing affects mental health is a tricky endeavor. While the changes brought about by the need for physical distancing are likely to produce a degree of anxiety in almost anyone, the severity will vary. Another difficulty is the lack of studies available related to intentional, prolonged, physical distancing (err... social distancing). While we have studies about the mental health effects of isolation, the use of long-term physical distancing as a tool to stop the spread of disease has never been studied. 
L.A.B. refers to the three biggest drawbacks to physical distancing: loneliness, anxiety, and boredom.
We’ll go over a number of techniques to help alleviate these feelings while being asked to be physically distant due to illness. 
Loneliness
One of the biggest obstacles during periods of physical distancing is loneliness.
Teens or pre-teens may find this especially hard as they’re often surrounded by their peers at school and during after school activities. This is a good time to work on your relationship as a family - walk together, talk together, and spend valuable time getting to know each other. There is some evidence that it’s easier to bond with others through audio and video communication, rather than texting. This may mean that your children will feel less lonely if they communicate through Skype/FaceTime or via phone call than if they were to communicate over text exclusively. Your child is feeling lonely? Encourage them to phone their friends.  If they are to bond face to face, encourage it, but mind the physical distancing. 
Anxiety
Children are often in a position where they feel they have little control, from having to do what adults tell them to lacking the tools necessary for projects they’d like to undertake. With physical distancing, there’s an even greater removal of agency - not only are they not allowed to make rules for themselves, they can’t even do the things that used to be in their power, like seeing their friends and choosing their extracurricular activities. One of the consequences of becoming sick and being asked to physically distance ourselves  is that our normal routines have been wrested away from us - one of the many things that lie outside of our control. One of the benefits of routine is that it gives us a sense of control, no matter how old we are - by simply following our routine, we are accomplishing something. We have agency over something. Locus of control, the feeling that you have control over your life, is one of the keys to good mental health. Children and teens will, inevitably, see substantial changes to their routines as a result of physical distancing. They don’t need to be up on time to catch the bus, or go to school where classes are rigidly structured, they don’t have sports or clubs once school is over. The resulting feeling can be disorienting; routines give us a sense of place in time. When your child is feeling listless, bored, or acting chaotic, it may be good to encourage them to create a routine. Do so in tandem with your child, helping them choose when to schedule certain activities. Make sure their routine involves mentally, physically, and spiritually stimulating activities.
Work hard to maintain your own routine as well; as we know, children emulate their parents. 
Alleviating anxiety is tricky, especially when everyone seems to be feeling it to some degree. Have honest conversations with your child about their feelings. Put extra effort into ensuring they have some degree of control over their lives. For example: You may ask for their input on what to make for supper, and help them learn how to cook. You may ask them what chores they want to do, and give them responsibility over those chores. The more that your child feels they have power over their own lives, the less anxiety they might experience. 
Boredom
You may be hard-pressed to find a group of kids who will tell you they love going to school. Nevertheless, you’re unlikely to find a group of kids who are all perpetually bored at school - they’ll enjoy gym class, or science, or talking with their friends. Throw in after school activities, and children often won’t have the time to be bored; their schedules are just too packed.
That’s all changed.
Boredom isn’t necessarily bad for your mental health; it can stimulate you to find a new hobby or do something creative. Perpetual boredom, on the other hand, can be a problem. Fortunately, there are still plenty of things you can do while maintaining physical distancing guidelines.
PLAY!
Have a backyard? Set up a couple of impromptu soccer nets and play. A little less space? Look up some YouTube videos of activities you and your kids can do by using body weight. Yoga, tumbling, build a fort, gymnastics, kung fu - the number of tutorials you can find online to relieve boredom is astounding.  Looking for something more mentally stimulating? Pick up some board games to play with your kids. Encourage them to learn to draw, write poetry, or play an instrument. These activities can serve a dual purpose - alleviating boredom while providing creative and social outlets.
Author Bio:  Veronica Wallace is a childhood educator and blogging enthusiast. Some of her favourite articles can be found on the Kidthink website. Kidthink specializes in offering clinical treatment of mental illness in children aged twelve and under, along with community outreach and training for this type of treatment. 
lessons from the last dance
lessons from the last dance

10 Lasting Lessons From The Last Dance Documentary


“Winning and leadership has a price!”

During the pandemic, one of the bright spots took place on Sunday evenings and watching the 5 weeks worth of the killer documentary. It was cool being able to show my kids why MJ was the best.  If you want some more life lessons from movies, check out 7 Life Lessons from the Movie HOOSIERS. 

1. Your why must make you cry

Michael Jordan tears up at the end of an episode, saying, “break.” He was caught up thinking about how much he cherished and desired winning. You’ll cry either because of how much it hurts, or because of how much effort goes into it. Pain of discipline or pain of regret. 

2.  You’re not good enough

Even the greatest of all-time was ignored, dissed, and slighted. He used it as motivation to prove himself right and others wrong.
It is actually necessary in order to achieve your best. #pukeandrally

3.  Next level dedication

Episode 3, Jordan told UNC Asst. Coach Roy Williams, that he “wanted to be the best.” Coach replied, “You’ll have to work much harder.” MJ said he worked just as hard as anyone else. Coach replied,      “Wait, you said you wanted to be the best!”

4. Be confident

“We will win Game 7!” Confidence is contagious and when true belief is there, nothing can stop a team with it. Jordan also didn’t think about missing a shot that he had yet to take. This is probably the biggest lasting lesson from the last dance documentary. 

5. Coaching others

Phil Jackson treated every player differently! He was a master at being able to build a bond and trust with players and thus got the most out of everyone. This is why he was the most successful NBA coach. 

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  10 lasting lessons from the last dance documentary

6. On losing

It’s not about the setback! After the Bulls lost to the Magic in the 1995 playoffs, Jordan told his strength coach, “See you in the morning.” He immediately returned to training.

7. “Reboundability”

It’s about the comeback! Jordan still missed shots, free throws, and had the ball stolen. But, what made him the greatest was that he always bounced back. ALWAYS!

8. No light-switch mentality

No one trained harder or was more competitive in practice than Jordan. “Michael Jordan was the only player that could turn it on and turn it off… And he never frickin’ turned it off.” – Roy Williams

9. Stand up for yourself

Steve Kerr once got into with Jordan in practice and they punched each other. He was feared by most, but once Kerr stood up for himself, he got MJ’s respect. 

10. Don’t eat pizza at 10:30pm in Salt Lake City. 

This lasting lesson from the last dance documentary revealed who Jordan actually was as a competitor.  This was a great documentary- Check out our list of the top ten mental toughness documentaries. 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

 
how to keep your sanity intact and thrive
 

how to keep your sanity intact and thrive


5 ways to keep your sanity intact and thrive during this time...


WE ARE ALL IN THIS... But not together...
  We experience it differently. 
  • Those with infants, school-aged children, teenagers, and NO kids have it different. 
  • People that can work from home experience it differently.
  • Mothers who are trying to teach their own kids from home AND their own classroom experience it differently.
  • Nurses, health-care workers, and the like who are on the front lines every day have it different.
  • Residents of nursing homes have it different.
  • Those who can't work have it different.
  • Those who are forced to work have it different.
  • Illinois is different than California.
  • New York City has it differently than Georgia.
 
"Different" implies comparison, but we still all experience it differently. In order to keep your sanity intact during this time, it will require focusSadly, division will occur. It will separate us all over the next several weeks and months and will cause more distress and fear and uncertainty.
The fall out from the quarantine and stay at home orders will rear its ugly head. The fall out will manifest as a form of PTSD. 

Focusing on differences isolates us, but focusing on the similarities connects us. Whatever we focus on, we feel!

We can choose to focus on the differences OR we can focus on the similarities. 
  • We all have opinions about the virus itself and its impact.
  • We all have "takes" on opening up the country and world.
  • We all have fear, indecision, and uncertainty.

5 ways to keep your sanity intact and thrive during this time...


1. Have a morning routine.
2. Have an evening routine. 
3. Physically distance, but...
4. Shut off the damn news.
5. Compete. 

1. 
Have a Morning Routine. 
- Wake-up time, exercise, quiet time, get dressed, make-bed. Whatever you do, keep it dialed in and tight. Remember, we are competing against our own mind!

2. Have An Evening Routine. 
The hours you sleep before midnight count double. Maintain the same bedtime you normally do to keep your sanity, OR get way out of whack. 


3. Physically Distance, but...
- But, do not social distance! Re-connect with someone in the past, connect with someone in your present, and reach out to someone whom you normally wouldn't. Remember, Connection is the opposite of distancing. 

4. Shut Off the Damn News...
- Every news station wants YOU to watch. It's called ratings.  The negative is way more powerful than the positive. But, it creeps into your mind and slowly oozes out of your mouth and actions. We have to include social media as news sites as well. Shut it off! We need to marinate our minds with positivity. 

5. Compete...
- Your mind wants you to stay safe. The way to remain safe is to stay indoors and under the covers. Your mind does not care about you reaching your goals. So, our mind starts to drift toward the insane and a slow spiral of more fear, apprehension, negativity, and distrust of others develop.
You need to compete against your own mind and push yourself, get out of any comfort zone you've created, and stay attacking. 

This is how you keep your sanity intact and thrive during this time. 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

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coronavirus anxiety

coronavirus anxiety

The ONE Action To Rid Yourself of Coronavirus Anxiety


My baseball coach would sometimes show the entire team an ACE card, usually the Ace of Spades. He spoke of  having an "ACE up his sleeve."  The card was a reminder that Action Changes Everything- ACE.  It is far easier to act our way into right thinking than it is to think our way into right acting. 
Action Changes Everything. 
Times are stressful and indeed tough. Add to it, that we need to breathe better with masks.  Experts and leaders pop-up every day with new information either confirming or disproving facts about our current situation. There is a lot of worry, financial insecurity, and fear of the unknown. Fear manages to keep us in a negative state longer than we want to stay and takes us further than we want to go.  Sadly, stress and anxiety during these times will increase. It will also leave a residue of worry for many people and result in overall heightened anxiety and stress levels.
Anxiety, stress, and worry will remain high and for many it'll become a new normal. The fallout from COVID-19 will result in a form of PTSD. 
So, what is the one cure to overcome coronavirus anxiety?  Exercise and having a routine are pillars in our house about how to overcome this pandemic. But, there is a more powerful antidote.
The action is connection. 
Connection builds confidence and confidence breeds courage. Social distancing, unfortunately, breeds a lack of connection. Thus, we have to integrate a deliberate plan to foster connection. Here are three (3) steps to build the connection to beat Coronavirus anxiety. 
Pick 5 new people every day to connect. 
Reach out to an old coach or mentor or Hinge person. 
Call one person every day. 

1. Pick 5 new people every day.

Go to your phone and select five random people to connect with. Thumb them a message checking in and asking a question. It's simple but powerful. It'll get a conversation going, but it will also get you thinking about somebody else and outside of your own head. The best relationships are not one-dimensional.  Focusing on Five people is the core component of our 30-day Mental Toughness Challenge.  One hack is to go to a different letter on your phone and simply start with five names there. I never knew I had so many "Mikes" in my contacts. 

2. Reach out to an old mentor or coach or Hinge person.

I love this tip from coach Ron MckeefreySend them a message or call letting them know what a difference that they made in your life. Try something like this "Coach, I haven't told you this, but you made such a difference in my life because..."  We may not know the result of our action, but if we take no action, there will be no result. WE may be the one to make a difference in their LIFE!

3. Call one person every day. 

Zoom meetings are fantastic, but just like regular meetings, people are guarded. Calling someone and being able to check-in with them about how you're doing is massive.
A problem shared becomes half a problem.
There is something magical that occurs when we hear ourselves speak. It takes our own issues and cuts them down. Being able to listen to someone else's struggle also puts us back to a place where we will gladly take our stuff and problems back. It grants us perspective.  Now, we have to be careful. We can't just talk to the same person every day and listen to each other complain about life. That simply breeds negativity and fear. 
Connection with other people is how we overcome coronavirus anxiety. Mental health issues are increasing by drastic numbers because it is tough for everyone to deal, cope, and handle the stress and lack of control. The solution is through connection. It's how we increase our mental toughness  We have to be deliberate about connecting with one another. These action steps are by design, not by default. Unless we are intentional about building connection then it won't get done. Rome wasn't built in a day, but it wasn't destroyed in a day either. Our mental wellness takes the form of a slow decline unless we consistently take small action steps. 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

   
end of the pandemic
end of the pandemic

How Should We Count The Days To The End of The Pandemic?


When? When? When?
This is a major question asked and posted about the Coronavirus pandemic.  Here was a question that was posed to my 5:15 am Bootcamp group a few weeks ago...
Do you count your reps going up or down? 
Now, I have always counted up! But, some people counted down and even one person shared that he counted up, until past half-way and then he counted down. He related it to climbing up a mountain and then coming down on its other side.  Ever notice that if there is an instructor, he/she may count down for everyone and then as a result, you'll count down too. Their voice trumps our own I count up for one simple reason! There can always be one more! When I get to 10, I try to do just one more. Just one more is a way we build grit. If I'm counting down, however, I can't go past zero. 
So, how should we count our days to the end of the pandemic? 
During my 50-mile trail run, my mentality was simply one-mile-at-a time! One mile at a time kept me focused just on my rhythm and what I can control. Except, when I hit mile 42, then I started counting down miles. And that's when it got tough At mile 42 on, I was now focused on just finishing the race and when your tired and a raging desire to be complete kicks in, it's even more crucial to focus on your process, not your results. During this pandemic, it is crucial that we focus on our process.
We must count up and avoid counting down!
Counting down to an end of the pandemic of coronavirus crisis means having a specific date in mind of when we return to our "normal." However, this is dangerous!  First, we can't know when our date will be! Who knows? Dates and deadlines change and switch almost daily, so we are trying to shoot a moving target. We don't know when things will open up and this unknown can cause stress. It also reminds us of our lack of control.  If we have a specific date in mind, then we are just setting ourselves up for a huge mental letdown. 

Admiral Stockdale was a POW for seven years during the Vietnam War. He endured immense torture and faced many atrocities as a prisoner. 
In the Jim Collins book, “Good To Great”, he mentioned how they overcome their own hardships. A key he said was: "never losing faith in eventually being released."  However, he also confronted the stark reality of his dire situation.
This would become known as:  Stockdale Paradox. 
He also stated that the optimists were the ones who would not make it. The optimists would state, “We will be home by Christmas.” Then, Christmas would come and go and optimists' would lose faith and succumb to their horrible conditions.
We can't focus on an end date to the pandemic or when we will move on with our lives. We need to stay dialed in to what we can control and getting better as a result of this hinge moment.  We need to create a routine for ourselves and do these 5 daily tasks during the coronavirus crisis.  Sadly, many more people will struggle during the next few weeks and months. One's level of mental toughness will be revealed and exposed during this struggle. We all can help each other out, by refusing to guesstimate or become time-travelers wondering what date this will all be over.  If you've been looking at a specific number of days or how long to the end of the pandemic- STOP IT. 
Remember a key to counting was invented by Muhammad Ali who said: " I don't count my sit-ups, I only count when they start to hurt." 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

why I felt guilty about my son being on the news during coronavirus crisis

Why I Felt Guilty About My Son Being On The News During Coronavirus Pandemic 

I finished playing 9-holes with my son. He is obsessed with the sport and wants to be good. We finish up every round the same way, we chip and putt. Again, he wants to be good.  The awesome people from WTHR 13 came over and interviewed us  (6 feet away) about what the Coronavirus crisis has meant in terms of our own routine, our relationship, and golf.  My past several mental toughness blog posts have all been focused on what we can do to marinate our minds and focus on what we can control. Everything on the news during coronavirus is negative. 

This is Why I Felt Guilty About My Son Being On The News During Coronavirus 

The entire news that evening was sad. It was death rates, new cases, and the shortage of supplies many of the health care workers face. The news addressed company lay-offs, and shut-downs and future economic possibilities and timelines. Then, here is a father and son playing golf during this crisis.  Now, our course at Stony Creek took great measures to protect everyone:  "no contact with anyone, no clubhouse, no range, no carts, no flagsticks, cups were upside down, and everyone was instructed to pick the ball up when close to the hole. Plus, we had hand sanitizer every few holes." However, instead of it being a feel-good story about how we bonded and spent time together and got better, it was the opposite. At least it felt that way at first. 
I saw it coming.
The number of negative comments on the FB page was enlightening. People were upset and questioning our entire thought processes.  
We were social distance shamed.
People were upset for a number of different reasons: they didn't understand why golf was essential, didn't know the safety measures that were taken. One was upset because their own course was closed, and another because golf was a rich sport. That's the tough part about being on the news during coronavirus pandemic.  Frankly, people are scared and the fear is real. There is no control and much uncertainty. We are starting to count the days to the end of the pandemic. 
It's a hinge moment in all of our lives.
So, being the only positive story on the news during coronavirus made me feel somewhat guilty. Until it dawned on me, "wait, we took precautions, and we are still living life as best as we can." I can't change anyone's mind about what's right or wrong and I know I'm not a spring breaker at the beach living it up with no cares.  However, to me and my family, sport and exercise are paramount! It provides us all an avenue and outlet for much frustration and lack of control. Being able to run 14 miles or being able to spend time with my son outside golfing is a blessing. During this time especially, exercise and movement should be a huge priority! I stopped feeling guilty when I was reminded that we don't live for the approval of others. Of course, I want you to like me, but even if you don't, I'm still going to live out my best possible life. My best life consists of getting after it and it is crazy at times because crazy is what creates cool stuff.  It's my role to share with you what I know about the mind, mental toughness, and how to be the best at getting better.  It's my role to help! This is painful for many because it requires that we do things that are difficult. That's not always popular. The truth hurts... But, I can either be popular and liked, or lead and inspire. Sometimes it's both, but often, they are exclusive. Just because I had a positive experience in the midst of crisis, did not mean I had to feel bad about it.  In the next month ahead, people are going to start to suffer more and more. Depression, financial insecurity, fear, anxiety, and the like. Our situations are going to get worse and no statistic is going to be able really to uncover the depth of how people handle and deal with this setback. We need to focus and create positive experiences in each of our lives and for others!   

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

   
stay mentally tough during coronavirus

stay mentally tough during the coronavirus


5 Daily Tasks To Stay Mentally Tough During The Coronavirus Crisis


Admiral James Stockdale was a prisoner for over seven years during the Vietnam War. He endured an immense amount of torture and faced many atrocities as a prisoner of war. In the Jim Collins book, “Good To Great”, he mentioned how they coped and never lost faith in eventually being released. However, at the same time, he also confronted the stark reality of his dire situation.
This would become known as the Stockdale Paradox. 
He also knew that the optimists were the ones who would not make it. The optimists would state, “We’ll be home by Christmas.” Then, Christmas would come and go and the optimists would lose faith and hope and succumb to the horrible conditions. This is an important lesson for us on 5 tasks to stay mentally tough during the Coronavirus crisis because we don’t know the future of next week or next month. It is important for us to focus on our daily tasks to overcome this adversity. 
1. Obstacle vs. Opportunity
2. Keep Routine
3. Focus on Others
4. Train
5. Wave To Everybody

1. Opportunity vs. Obstacle
The situation does not change, merely how we view it.
We view our current situation either as an obstacle or an opportunity. If we look at the situation as an obstacle, then we’ll see the threats that face us (economy, quarantine, how long it’ll last, etc). As a result, we’ll automatically adopt a negative mindset and our anxiety and stress levels will increase. However, if we can focus on the coronavirus crisis as an opportunity, then we’ll see the challenges in front of us. It's probably the powerful way to be mentally tough during the coronavirus.  We’ll focus instead on how we can adapt, get better and improve. Our attitude changes as a result.
2. Keep Your Routine What causes us all stress, apprehension, and worry is the sudden lack of control in our lives. Our schedules have all completely fallen apart and now we are left to deal, handle, and cope with it. We might even start to count down the days to the end of the pandemic (which is wrong).  In order to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus and get back some semblance of control, we need to develop a routine. Write out blocks of time to schedule for different activities, family, and work. It will create a feeling of comfort because our environment now has created freedom for our mind to focus only on what is in front of us. There is no perfect routine and it will mess-up and deviate. The key is to merely get back to our routine and refer to it often.
3. Focus on Others The way that we get outside of our own head is to focus on others. It’s simple because we cannot help out anyone else in life without also helping out ourselves.
It’s the premise and belief that NO ONE Gets There ALONE.
Buy a neighbor something, leave a positive company review, comment positively on a group page, or text someone and let him or her know that you were thinking of them. There are tons of opportunities and it's back to the way to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus. Focusing on someone else is how we create meaning in our lives and get outside of our own troubles. And we need to be intentional about this area because it happens by design, not by default.
4. Train
We perform like we train!
Everything is closed, but it doesn’t mean giving up exercise. It is actually the perfect opportunity to start training for something that you didn’t have the time to do. Make it part of your routine. If training is too tough to bear, then make a commitment to exercise every day. Walk, get outside, ride a bike, but get moving. We were born to move and the benefits are endless! Remember, it's considered essential.  You’ll see that exercise means not needing a gym.
5. Wave to Everybody
And say hello to everybody.
There will be more negativity now in the coming weeks than most any other time in our lives. The negativity will be infectious! Thus, we have to make a commitment to breed positivity and share it with others. We are all in this together! And all we have to do is acknowledge the other person to remind ourselves that they are suffering too. Many people are struggling and it’s a small but intentional way to improve the atmosphere. Also, don’t expect anything in reply, but know we are doing it for ourselves as well. These simple, but not easy 5 simple tasks to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus will reap benefits!

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

Hinge Moment
Hinge Moment

The Hinge Moment of The Coronavirus Crisis 


Every door has a hinge! A door without a hinge is a wall, it just doesn't work! When you hear of doors opening or closing in life, it is because of the hinge. If you ever hear a rusty door, it's not the door that's rusty at all, it's the hinge that's rusty
Small hinges open big doors! 
In our own lives, the hinge connects who we are with who we are going to become! If you look at any important game or close competition, it came down to that one play that made all of the difference. In our own lives, there was one person who made such an impact on our lives. If we reflect, one decision connected us to who we would become.  The Importance of Mental Toughness is that no matter how bad our situation, how bleak an outcome looks, it only takes one!!
One person, moment, or decision. 
Now there will be many significant moments and they are not always evident when they occur. Sometimes we don't know (and can't know) the impact of that one moment or person until weeks, months or years later!
We can't connect the dots looking forward, we can only connect the dots looking backward! 
Except, tragedies that happen in our lives become an immediate hinge moment. Most of life's setbacks are inconveniences, but tragedies such as the death of a loved one, cancer, or serious accidents are immediate because, from that moment on, everything is different.  The coronavirus crisis is a Hinge Moment.  Now, we can't know the impact of this Coronavirus situation, but what we do know is that things are, and will be, different. 

Here's how to respond to this external crisis


Read: The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness 


There is fear, uncertainty, and a severe lack of control. The veil of control that we think we have has been lowered. We are not in control and now we are required to deal, handle, and cope with the adversity!  This timestamp of life will reveal our level of grit, determination, resiliency, and mental toughness.  Simple question- does this hinge moment become a time of staying bitter or getting better
Rome was not built in a day, but it was not destroyed in a day either! 
It is a slow fade that takes place. NOW, becomes an either /or period in our lives! We use an excuse to not work-out or train. We cop out by blaming the external for our plight. We stay angry and lash out. We criticize anybody or anything that messes with how we see the world and the Coronavirus situation. We isolate. We remain fearful and anxious.  OR We set up a routine for our daily lives. We write out one area of our life that we want to focus on. We stay connected with others through texting, Facebook, or calls. We marinate our own mind with mental toughness! We double down on our training. We attack a 30-day challenge! We master the simple! We focus on others because it gets us outside of our own head.  There is no easy way out. There is no short-cut. Most people will stop, complain, and eventually quit.  But NOT YOU!  Make the choice to prepare and get better. It will pay-off! We just don't know when that pay off will happen. Life pays us off when IT wants to, not when WE want it to! 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

     
most important tool to homeschool during coronavirus crisis

most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis


Most Important Tool To Homeschool During The Coronavirus Crisis


If you're looking for a short-cut through the coronavirus crisis, you won't find it. The only way out is through!  This is an obstacle in all of our lives with no timeline, but underneath it lies an opportunity.
It is an opportunity to get better! 
What causes us all stress, apprehension, and worry is the sudden lack of control in our lives. Our schedules have all completely fallen apart and now we are left to deal with it. Keeping perspective is vital during this period. Most have it rough right now, and many have it worse than you.  I have two-grade school kids and this is an opportunity that we must maximize. We do it by exercising control over the things that we can control. Even with travel bans, we still control the four walls inside of our home.  Since so many are now faced with an extreme amount of stress and an onslaught of schooling, here is the most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis.

Here is a massive FREE resource page with thousands of tools for any parent in need of K-12 educational resources. 


We turn this obstacle into an opportunity by establishing a ROUTINE! 
Almost everything we do contains a routine... How we wake up in the morning, go to work, eat our food, and even shave.  We have become so routine that we are not even aware of it, hence routine.  We implement these daily routines because our mind seeks comfort, structure, and discipline. In order to get better in this situation as parents, we have to get to establish a ROUTINE.
The routine you set will trump the instructions you give.
And because there is much uncertainty right now, create an environment of comfort that will encourage learning for your kids. This is NOT the time to be lax about screen time or taking it easy. Build leisure time into your routine instead. If we are disciplined during this time, then we create freedom for the mind.  Your routine is the go-to tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis. 

Here are the 5 keys to an effective homeschool routine.


1. Write it Down.
2. Set Time Limits. 
3. Create Habits.
4. Exercise & Fun. 
5. Perfection is The Enemy. 

keep routine at home

1 . Write it Down- 

Writing down the schedule keeps us all focused and accountable. If it's not written down, then we will simply forget. Our mind gets comfort when it SEES the plan that we set.  If our schedule constantly changes, then write down a few different scenarios. We can always go back and check the scorecard of "when" something needs to be done. 

2. Set Time Limits- 

Our schedule here (left) is set up in approximately 2-hour segments. One of my favorites is Coach Brian Clarke's schedule (below). They have a larger family, so there's is more dialed into 30-minute segments. Having chunks of time allows some leeway if our own work schedule gets in the way and it provides buffer room for transition time. 

3. Create Habits-  

During this time of the coronavirus crisis, there is some major yard work, garage and basement deep cleanings that need to be done in our home. It's a perfect time to set them up to tackle these projects that we haven't had the inclination to do. If we make it a daily occurrence, then it becomes a habit. We function best with the habits that we create. 

4. Exercise & Fun- 

In our home, we get after it... We have this coronavirus crisis time set up now as a major training block for strength, power, and fitness. We don't need a gym, we just need some space either outside or in the basement. There is a great opportunity to think about movement and create positive patterns and habits in their lives. Exercising and working out allows them to experience some accomplishment and strengthen the mental toughness muscle. It also provides an outlet for stress and aggravation that will build up.  It's important to have personal and friend time included.  The most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis is having a routine. Fun needs to be part of this routine. They have to have an escape and be able to connect with others. 

5. Perfection is the enemy- 

Too often, we fail to set a standard because we don't want to fail the standard. This is stinkin' thinking... Spoiler alert- The routine you establish will break down at some point and you'll have to adjust.
Perfection is the enemy of good!
Having a routine means doing your best to create structure, comfort, and discipline for your kids. In order to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis, it is imperative to set up a routine. When it is in place, they will be more receptive to learning, changes, and setbacks. 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly.