coronavirus anxiety

coronavirus anxiety

The ONE Action To Rid Yourself of Coronavirus Anxiety


My baseball coach would sometimes show the entire team an ACE card, usually the Ace of Spades. He spoke of  having an “ACE up his sleeve.” 

The card was a reminder that Action Changes Everything– ACE. 

It is far easier to act our way into right thinking than it is to think our way into right acting. 

Action Changes Everything. 

Times are stressful and indeed tough. Add to it, that we need to breathe better with masks. 

Experts and leaders pop-up every day with new information either confirming or disproving facts about our current situation. There is a lot of worry, financial insecurity, and fear of the unknown. Fear manages to keep us in a negative state longer than we want to stay and takes us further than we want to go. 

Sadly, stress and anxiety during these times will increase. It will also leave a residue of worry for many people and result in overall heightened anxiety and stress levels.

Anxiety, stress, and worry will remain high and for many it’ll become a new normal. The fallout from COVID-19 will result in a form of PTSD. 

So, what is the one cure to overcome coronavirus anxiety? 

Exercise and having a routine are pillars in our house about how to overcome this pandemic. But, there is a more powerful antidote.

The action is connection. 

Connection builds confidence and confidence breeds courage.

Social distancing, unfortunately, breeds a lack of connection. Thus, we have to integrate a deliberate plan to foster connection.

Here are three (3) steps to build the connection to beat Coronavirus anxiety. 

Pick 5 new people every day to connect. 
Reach out to an old coach or mentor or Hinge person. 
Call one person every day. 

1. Pick 5 new people every day.

Go to your phone and select five random people to connect with. Thumb them a message checking in and asking a question. It’s simple but powerful. It’ll get a conversation going, but it will also get you thinking about somebody else and outside of your own head. The best relationships are not one-dimensional. 

Focusing on Five people is the core component of our 30-day Mental Toughness Challenge. 

One hack is to go to a different letter on your phone and simply start with five names there. I never knew I had so many “Mikes” in my contacts. 


2. Reach out to an old mentor or coach or Hinge person.

I love this tip from coach Ron MckeefreySend them a message or call letting them know what a difference that they made in your life. Try something like this “Coach, I haven’t told you this, but you made such a difference in my life because…” 

We may not know the result of our action, but if we take no action, there will be no result. WE may be the one to make a difference in their LIFE!


3. Call one person every day. 

Zoom meetings are fantastic, but just like regular meetings, people are guarded. Calling someone and being able to check-in with them about how you’re doing is massive.

A problem shared becomes half a problem.

There is something magical that occurs when we hear ourselves speak. It takes our own issues and cuts them down. Being able to listen to someone else’s struggle also puts us back to a place where we will gladly take our stuff and problems back.

It grants us perspective. 

Now, we have to be careful. We can’t just talk to the same person every day and listen to each other complain about life. That simply breeds negativity and fear. 


Connection with other people is how we overcome coronavirus anxiety.

Mental health issues are increasing by drastic numbers because it is tough for everyone to deal, cope, and handle the stress and lack of control. The solution is through connection. It’s how we increase our mental toughness 

We have to be deliberate about connecting with one another. These action steps are by design, not by default. Unless we are intentional about building connection then it won’t get done.

Rome wasn’t built in a day, but it wasn’t destroyed in a day either. Our mental wellness takes the form of a slow decline unless we consistently take small action steps. 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

 

 

end of the pandemic

end of the pandemic


How Should We Count The Days To The End of The Pandemic?


When? When? When?

This is a major question asked and posted about the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Here was a question that was posed to my 5:15 am Bootcamp group a few weeks ago…

Do you count your reps going up or down? 

Now, I have always counted up! But, some people counted down and even one person shared that he counted up, until past half-way and then he counted down.

He related it to climbing up a mountain and then coming down on its other side. 

Ever notice that if there is an instructor, he/she may count down for everyone and then as a result, you’ll count down too. Their voice trumps our own

I count up for one simple reason! There can always be one more! When I get to 10, I try to do just one more. Just one more is a way we build grit. If I’m counting down, however, I can’t go past zero. 

So, how should we count our days to the end of the pandemic? 

During my 50-mile trail run, my mentality was simply one-mile-at-a time!

One mile at a time kept me focused just on my rhythm and what I can control. Except, when I hit mile 42, then I started counting down miles. And that’s when it got tough

At mile 42 on, I was now focused on just finishing the race and when your tired and a raging desire to be complete kicks in, it’s even more crucial to focus on your process, not your results.

During this pandemic, it is crucial that we focus on our process.

We must count up and avoid counting down!

Counting down to an end of the pandemic of coronavirus crisis means having a specific date in mind of when we return to our “normal.” However, this is dangerous! 

First, we can’t know when our date will be!

Who knows?

Dates and deadlines change and switch almost daily, so we are trying to shoot a moving target. We don’t know when things will open up and this unknown can cause stress. It also reminds us of our lack of control. 

If we have a specific date in mind, then we are just setting ourselves up for a huge mental letdown. 


Admiral Stockdale was a POW for seven years during the Vietnam War. He endured immense torture and faced many atrocities as a prisoner. 

In the Jim Collins book, “Good To Great”, he mentioned how they overcome their own hardships. A key he said was: “never losing faith in eventually being released.”  However, he also confronted the stark reality of his dire situation.

This would become known as:  Stockdale Paradox. 

He also stated that the optimists were the ones who would not make it. The optimists would state, “We will be home by Christmas.” Then, Christmas would come and go and optimists’ would lose faith and succumb to their horrible conditions.


We can’t focus on an end date to the pandemic or when we will move on with our lives. We need to stay dialed in to what we can control and getting better as a result of this hinge moment. 

We need to create a routine for ourselves and do these 5 daily tasks during the coronavirus crisis. 

Sadly, many more people will struggle during the next few weeks and months. One’s level of mental toughness will be revealed and exposed during this struggle. We all can help each other out, by refusing to guesstimate or become time-travelers wondering what date this will all be over. 

If you’ve been looking at a specific number of days or how long to the end of the pandemic- STOP IT. 

Remember a key to counting was invented by Muhammad Ali who said: ” I don’t count my sit-ups, I only count when they start to hurt.” 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

why I felt guilty about my son being on the news during coronavirus crisis

Why I Felt Guilty About My Son Being On The News During Coronavirus Pandemic 

I finished playing 9-holes with my son. He is obsessed with the sport and wants to be good. We finish up every round the same way, we chip and putt. Again, he wants to be good. 

The awesome people from WTHR 13 came over and interviewed us  (6 feet away) about what the Coronavirus crisis has meant in terms of our own routine, our relationship, and golf. 

My past several mental toughness blog posts have all been focused on what we can do to marinate our minds and focus on what we can control. Everything on the news during coronavirus is negative. 

This is Why I Felt Guilty About My Son Being On The News During Coronavirus 

The entire news that evening was sad. It was death rates, new cases, and the shortage of supplies many of the health care workers face. The news addressed company lay-offs, and shut-downs and future economic possibilities and timelines.

Then, here is a father and son playing golf during this crisis. 

Now, our course at Stony Creek took great measures to protect everyone:  no contact with anyone, no clubhouse, no range, no carts, no flagsticks, cups were upside down, and everyone was instructed to pick the ball up when close to the hole. Plus, we had hand sanitizer every few holes.”

However, instead of it being a feel-good story about how we bonded and spent time together and got better, it was the opposite. At least it felt that way at first. 

I saw it coming.

The number of negative comments on the FB page was enlightening. People were upset and questioning our entire thought processes.  

We were social distance shamed.

People were upset for a number of different reasons: they didn’t understand why golf was essential, didn’t know the safety measures that were taken. One was upset because their own course was closed, and another because golf was a rich sport. That’s the tough part about being on the news during coronavirus pandemic. 

Frankly, people are scared and the fear is real. There is no control and much uncertainty. We are starting to count the days to the end of the pandemic. 

It’s a hinge moment in all of our lives.

So, being the only positive story on the news during coronavirus made me feel somewhat guilty. Until it dawned on me, “wait, we took precautions, and we are still living life as best as we can.” I can’t change anyone’s mind about what’s right or wrong and I know I’m not a spring breaker at the beach living it up with no cares. 

However, to me and my family, sport and exercise are paramount! It provides us all an avenue and outlet for much frustration and lack of control. Being able to run 14 miles or being able to spend time with my son outside golfing is a blessing.

During this time especially, exercise and movement should be a huge priority!

I stopped feeling guilty when I was reminded that we don’t live for the approval of others. Of course, I want you to like me, but even if you don’t, I’m still going to live out my best possible life. My best life consists of getting after it and it is crazy at times because crazy is what creates cool stuff. 

It’s my role to share with you what I know about the mind, mental toughness, and how to be the best at getting better.  It’s my role to help!

This is painful for many because it requires that we do things that are difficult. That’s not always popular. The truth hurts…

But, I can either be popular and liked, or lead and inspire. Sometimes it’s both, but often, they are exclusive. Just because I had a positive experience in the midst of crisis, did not mean I had to feel bad about it. 

In the next month ahead, people are going to start to suffer more and more. Depression, financial insecurity, fear, anxiety, and the like. Our situations are going to get worse and no statistic is going to be able really to uncover the depth of how people handle and deal with this setback.

We need to focus and create positive experiences in each of our lives and for others! 

 

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

 

 

stay mentally tough during coronavirus

stay mentally tough during the coronavirus


5 Daily Tasks To Stay Mentally Tough During The Coronavirus Crisis


Admiral James Stockdale was a prisoner for over seven years during the Vietnam War. He endured an immense amount of torture and faced many atrocities as a prisoner of war.

In the Jim Collins book, “Good To Great”, he mentioned how they coped and never lost faith in eventually being released. However, at the same time, he also confronted the stark reality of his dire situation.

This would become known as the Stockdale Paradox. 

He also knew that the optimists were the ones who would not make it. The optimists would state, “We’ll be home by Christmas.” Then, Christmas would come and go and the optimists would lose faith and hope and succumb to the horrible conditions.

This is an important lesson for us on 5 tasks to stay mentally tough during the Coronavirus crisis because we don’t know the future of next week or next month. It is important for us to focus on our daily tasks to overcome this adversity. 

1. Obstacle vs. Opportunity
2. Keep Routine
3. Focus on Others
4. Train
5. Wave To Everybody

1. Opportunity vs. Obstacle

The situation does not change, merely how we view it.

We view our current situation either as an obstacle or an opportunity.

If we look at the situation as an obstacle, then we’ll see the threats that face us (economy, quarantine, how long it’ll last, etc). As a result, we’ll automatically adopt a negative mindset and our anxiety and stress levels will increase.

However, if we can focus on the coronavirus crisis as an opportunity, then we’ll see the challenges in front of us. It’s probably the powerful way to be mentally tough during the coronavirus. 

We’ll focus instead on how we can adapt, get better and improve. Our attitude changes as a result.


2. Keep Your Routine

What causes us all stress, apprehension, and worry is the sudden lack of control in our lives. Our schedules have all completely fallen apart and now we are left to deal, handle, and cope with it. We might even start to count down the days to the end of the pandemic (which is wrong). 

In order to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus and get back some semblance of control, we need to develop a routine.

Write out blocks of time to schedule for different activities, family, and work. It will create a feeling of comfort because our environment now has created freedom for our mind to focus only on what is in front of us.

There is no perfect routine and it will mess-up and deviate. The key is to merely get back to our routine and refer to it often.


3. Focus on Others

The way that we get outside of our own head is to focus on others. It’s simple because we cannot help out anyone else in life without also helping out ourselves.

It’s the premise and belief that NO ONE Gets There ALONE.

Buy a neighbor something, leave a positive company review, comment positively on a group page, or text someone and let him or her know that you were thinking of them.

There are tons of opportunities and it’s back to the way to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus.

Focusing on someone else is how we create meaning in our lives and get outside of our own troubles. And we need to be intentional about this area because it happens by design, not by default.


4. Train

We perform like we train!

Everything is closed, but it doesn’t mean giving up exercise. It is actually the perfect opportunity to start training for something that you didn’t have the time to do. Make it part of your routine.

If training is too tough to bear, then make a commitment to exercise every day.

Walk, get outside, ride a bike, but get moving. We were born to move and the benefits are endless! Remember, it’s considered essential. 

You’ll see that exercise means not needing a gym.


5. Wave to Everybody

And say hello to everybody.

There will be more negativity now in the coming weeks than most any other time in our lives. The negativity will be infectious! Thus, we have to make a commitment to breed positivity and share it with others.

We are all in this together!

And all we have to do is acknowledge the other person to remind ourselves that they are suffering too. Many people are struggling and it’s a small but intentional way to improve the atmosphere. Also, don’t expect anything in reply, but know we are doing it for ourselves as well.

These simple, but not easy 5 simple tasks to stay mentally tough during the coronavirus will reap benefits!

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

Hinge Moment

Hinge Moment


The Hinge Moment of The Coronavirus Crisis 


Every door has a hinge! A door without a hinge is a wall, it just doesn’t work!

When you hear of doors opening or closing in life, it is because of the hinge. If you ever hear a rusty door, it’s not the door that’s rusty at all, it’s the hinge that’s rusty

Small hinges open big doors! 

In our own lives, the hinge connects who we are with who we are going to become!

If you look at any important game or close competition, it came down to that one play that made all of the difference. In our own lives, there was one person who made such an impact on our lives. If we reflect, one decision connected us to who we would become. 

The Importance of Mental Toughness is that no matter how bad our situation, how bleak an outcome looks, it only takes one!!

One person, moment, or decision. 

Now there will be many significant moments and they are not always evident when they occur. Sometimes we don’t know (and can’t know) the impact of that one moment or person until weeks, months or years later!

We can’t connect the dots looking forward, we can only connect the dots looking backward! 

Except, tragedies that happen in our lives become an immediate hinge moment. Most of life’s setbacks are inconveniences, but tragedies such as the death of a loved one, cancer, or serious accidents are immediate because, from that moment on, everything is different. 

The coronavirus crisis is a Hinge Moment. 

Now, we can’t know the impact of this Coronavirus situation, but what we do know is that things are, and will be, different. 


Here’s how to respond to this external crisis


Read: The Hinge: The Importance of Mental Toughness 


There is fear, uncertainty, and a severe lack of control. The veil of control that we think we have has been lowered. We are not in control and now we are required to deal, handle, and cope with the adversity! 

This timestamp of life will reveal our level of grit, determination, resiliency, and mental toughness. 

Simple question- does this hinge moment become a time of staying bitter or getting better

Rome was not built in a day, but it was not destroyed in a day either! 

It is a slow fade that takes place.

NOW, becomes an either /or period in our lives!

We use an excuse to not work-out or train. We cop out by blaming the external for our plight. We stay angry and lash out. We criticize anybody or anything that messes with how we see the world and the Coronavirus situation. We isolate. We remain fearful and anxious. 

OR

We set up a routine for our daily lives. We write out one area of our life that we want to focus on. We stay connected with others through texting, Facebook, or calls. We marinate our own mind with mental toughness! We double down on our training. We attack a 30-day challenge! We master the simple! We focus on others because it gets us outside of our own head. 

There is no easy way out. There is no short-cut. Most people will stop, complain, and eventually quit. 

But NOT YOU! 

Make the choice to prepare and get better. It will pay-off! We just don’t know when that pay off will happen. Life pays us off when IT wants to, not when WE want it to! 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

 

 

 

most important tool to homeschool during coronavirus crisis

most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis


Most Important Tool To Homeschool During The Coronavirus Crisis


If you’re looking for a short-cut through the coronavirus crisis, you won’t find it. The only way out is through! 

This is an obstacle in all of our lives with no timeline, but underneath it lies an opportunity.

It is an opportunity to get better! 

What causes us all stress, apprehension, and worry is the sudden lack of control in our lives. Our schedules have all completely fallen apart and now we are left to deal with it. Keeping perspective is vital during this period.

Most have it rough right now, and many have it worse than you. 

I have two-grade school kids and this is an opportunity that we must maximize. We do it by exercising control over the things that we can control. Even with travel bans, we still control the four walls inside of our home. 

Since so many are now faced with an extreme amount of stress and an onslaught of schooling, here is the most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis.


Here is a massive FREE resource page with thousands of tools for any parent in need of K-12 educational resources. 


We turn this obstacle into an opportunity by establishing a ROUTINE! 

Almost everything we do contains a routine… How we wake up in the morning, go to work, eat our food, and even shave.  We have become so routine that we are not even aware of it, hence routine. 

We implement these daily routines because our mind seeks comfort, structure, and discipline. In order to get better in this situation as parents, we have to get to establish a ROUTINE.

The routine you set will trump the instructions you give.

And because there is much uncertainty right now, create an environment of comfort that will encourage learning for your kids. This is NOT the time to be lax about screen time or taking it easy. Build leisure time into your routine instead. If we are disciplined during this time, then we create freedom for the mind. 

Your routine is the go-to tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis. 


Here are the 5 keys to an effective homeschool routine.


1. Write it Down.
2. Set Time Limits. 
3. Create Habits.
4. Exercise & Fun. 
5. Perfection is The Enemy. 

keep routine at home

1 . Write it Down- 

Writing down the schedule keeps us all focused and accountable. If it’s not written down, then we will simply forget. Our mind gets comfort when it SEES the plan that we set.  If our schedule constantly changes, then write down a few different scenarios. We can always go back and check the scorecard of “when” something needs to be done. 

2. Set Time Limits- 

Our schedule here (left) is set up in approximately 2-hour segments. One of my favorites is Coach Brian Clarke’s schedule (below). They have a larger family, so there’s is more dialed into 30-minute segments. Having chunks of time allows some leeway if our own work schedule gets in the way and it provides buffer room for transition time. 

3. Create Habits-  

During this time of the coronavirus crisis, there is some major yard work, garage and basement deep cleanings that need to be done in our home. It’s a perfect time to set them up to tackle these projects that we haven’t had the inclination to do. If we make it a daily occurrence, then it becomes a habit. We function best with the habits that we create. 

4. Exercise & Fun- 

In our home, we get after it… We have this coronavirus crisis time set up now as a major training block for strength, power, and fitness. We don’t need a gym, we just need some space either outside or in the basement. There is a great opportunity to think about movement and create positive patterns and habits in their lives. Exercising and working out allows them to experience some accomplishment and strengthen the mental toughness muscle. It also provides an outlet for stress and aggravation that will build up. 

It’s important to have personal and friend time included.  The most important tool to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis is having a routine. Fun needs to be part of this routine. They have to have an escape and be able to connect with others. 

5. Perfection is the enemy- 

Too often, we fail to set a standard because we don’t want to fail the standard. This is stinkin’ thinking… Spoiler alert- The routine you establish will break down at some point and you’ll have to adjust.

Perfection is the enemy of good!

Having a routine means doing your best to create structure, comfort, and discipline for your kids. In order to homeschool during the coronavirus crisis, it is imperative to set up a routine. When it is in place, they will be more receptive to learning, changes, and setbacks. 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

 

 

 

help your athlete cope with the coronavirus crisis


4 Ways To Help Your Athlete Cope With The Coronavirus Crisis


We are all in uncharted waters. We have never been here before and no one knows what is next. 

A sailboat is off course 99% of the time! In the open ocean, sailboats are in a constant state of flux. They find the destination by making adjustments. Tacking is how they do it, the series of zigzagging maneuvers that captains perform to use the wind and stay on course. 

We are all off course right now. We need to adjust. 

Mental Toughness is how we deal, handle, and cope with the adversity in life. It is not easy, but it is necessary. We are all being hit with major struggles and setbacks! How you respond to the coronavirus crises will make a big impact on your mental state and performance moving forward. Puke & Rally: It’s not about the Setback, It’s about the Comeback.

Here are 4 ways to help your athlete cope with the coronavirus crisis

1. You’ll Probably Get Depressed.
2. Be An Athlete.
3. Routine, Routine, Routine…
4. Focus on Others. 

1. You’ll Probably Get Depressed-

The way athletes cope with life is through their sport.

If sport is okay and we are performing well, then life more easily works itself out. It is when we have severe on-the-field OR off-the-field issues that cause our stress levels and anxiety to spike. 

You’ll need to treat this crisis as a major loss and/or death because the emotions experienced will be similar. 

WHY?

Because once we remove our primary coping skill of sport, then we are now forced to deal in other ways and we often lack those other coping skills.  This is the same reason why injured athletes experience depression.  

Just know that you’ll probably experience sadness, mood swings, or don’t feel like doing anything! It’s okay and it’s normal. The key here is to feel that emotion and just know it too will pass and that there is nothing wrong with you. 

Allow yourself some time and grieve space every day to deal with it. This is how to cope with the coronavirus crisis. The worse thing is to simply ignore the emotions you’ll feel because then they will pop up when we least want them to.


Check Out- How The CoronaVirus Can Actually Help Our Mental Health


2. Be An Athlete- 

Everyone is an athlete, our office is just different.

We all have to approach the current state with a continued mindset of an athlete. Just because the sport has been taken away, does not mean your identity is gone! This crisis and outbreak is just another difficult opponent. As an athlete, we have learned mental skills along our path that will help us handle this issue. It means adopting the same mentality as a competitor. Just know that we are still competing against the most difficult opponent, which is our own mind.

Our mind wants to focus on how messed up things are and how much is out of our control. It will even want to count down the days till it’s over, which is wrong! 

No doubt about it, right now, it sucks and there is a ton out of our control!

So, are we going to stay at the pity party where no one else shows up, or get focused on what is in our control? 


3. Routine, Routine, Routine…

We are creatures of habit and we crave structure and discipline. The only bad routine is not having one!

It is during these times of undue stress, that we have to master the simple things. Our own mind will try and sabotage ourselves. It will want to blame others, convince us that this is permanent, and keep us in a hole of destructive and unproductive thoughts. Our own mind will continue to run wild unless we take those thoughts captive and maintain a routine. 

Practice self-care!

Maintain consistent sleep and wake schedules. Stay focused on exercising and keeping that outlet alive. Eat well and stay hydrated…All of the simple things that we’ve been told over and over again becomes even more important now! Master The Simple!

Also, we’ll have to learn how to effectively breathe with masks…

It is not the time to indulge in all-week NetFlix binges, or gorge out. It’s fine to chill, destress and decompress every day, but keep a healthy routine in your life. 


4. Connect With Others!

The reason why the book NO ONE Gets There ALONE was so important is that it echoed “if you want to go fast, go alone, but if you want to go far, then go together.”

We need others.

We need the connection. 

However, the coronavirus crisis and the powers that be are forcing us to isolate. Isolation is destructive. Nothing except mushrooms grow in the dark, and who likes those? 

When we are stuck inside of our own head, we are behind enemy lines!

Only through our connection with others can we get better. The way to help your athlete cope is to focus on others.

We can’t help out anyone else in life without also helping out ourselves. We can’t coach ourselves very well. But, if I am able to focus on helping someone else out, someone less fortunate, or even connecting with a friend, then I am no longer dwelling on my own problems and circumstance. If I can focus on others, then the person I am really coaching up is myself! 

The most selfish thing that you can do is to help out someone else. 

Here are some additional experts’ ways to help your athlete cope with the coronavirus crisis. 


Melinda Harrison  

Reach out and talk to someone. Tell them that you do not want them to solve your problem or make you feel better, just listen to you. A common blindspot of many athletes its that they have used their grit to work through other problems so they should be able to work through this one. This one is tough. Encourage them to find a secure base and talk out their feelings.


Megan Buning, PhD

Adapt on the fly. Adaptability not only helps you win in your sport but also helps you overcome the biggest obstacles in life. This is that moment. An obstacle. Feel what you feel then apply your skill of being adaptable to figure out how you will overcome this obstacle.   

 


Mark Lombardo, Psy.D.

Find a way to improve a part of your game during the time away. Through individual physical training and also through watching videos and/or reading to challenge yourself to come back better is some way than you were before this unfortunate circumstance arose.

 


Madeline Barlow, PhD  
While it may be challenging to see the positives in such a challenging situation, it would be helpful to seek out other activities that bring you joy.

 

 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 


coronavirus and mental health

coronavirus and mental health


How The Coronavirus Can Actually Improve Our Mental Health


It’s an unprecedented time.

We are in the darkness and we have never experienced anything that resembles living in the movie “I Am Legend.”

Everything is canceled, and we are all quarantined and staying home. The NCAA Tournament, the NBA, an entire country on lock-down. Entire athletic conferences and schools have suspended entire upcoming seasons! It’s hysteria. 

No one knows exactly how these dots will connect. We will only be able to connect the dots looking back after these events have passed. This is a hinge moment in our lives. 

The fall out will be bad, many people who can’t work because of cancelations will go without paychecks, kids who rely on school for food will go without. Those who will get the virus will suffer and need treatment. We will even start to count the days to the end of the pandemic

We are in a compromised position as a nation and humanity. 

That said…

So, here’s how the coronavirus can actually improve our mental health. 

Know what you’re feeling!

When I heard about my speaking engagement in California being canceled, I was angry! 

Every time I read about how to wash my hands, I feel stupid! 

When I heard about a few athletes and Tom Hanks testing positive for COVID-19, I was scared!

When I was informed that the state swim meet for young age group swimmers was canceled, I was sad! They’ve spent months training and now, nothing… 

The way out is always the way through, but we improve our own mental health by knowing what we are actually feeling. It is okay to be scared and angry and fearful. But, we just have to know the emotions that we are feeling. It doesn’t mean we have to like the feelings and emotions, but we can’t deny them.

Emotions will make their way into our house party one way or another, so just invite them, and then, ask them to leave when it is time. 

We would get better if we weren’t so busy rejecting our feelings about what to feel and not feel. 

It’s simple, but not easy, it means being self-aware and willing to go to the negative space in our own head.  If we reject our feelings, then they will pop up when we do not want them to.

If we do not transform our pain, then we will transmit it! 

Know the feeling, acknowledge it, and be comfortable being uncomfortable. This too shall pass! 

Then, turn your thoughts toward someone else that you can help and be of service! 

#pukeandrally 


 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

Ladder People

Ladder People


The Ladder People In Our Lives


After Kelvin Sampson became the head basketball coach at The University of Houston in 2014, an office-warming gift soon arrived.

Kelvin Sampson had a distinguished coaching resume. He coached at the University of Oklahoma for twelve seasons, reaching the NCAA tournament for 11 of those years. He was twice awarded coach of the year. 

He departed for Indiana University and coached there from 2006-2008. However, in February 2008, he was dismissed from Indiana University and the NCAA gave Coach Sampson a five-year show clause penalty for making impermissible phone calls and texts.

For the next five seasons, he became an NBA assistant coach, becoming an extra set of eyes with the Houston Rockets and Milwaukee Bucks.

Then in 2014, the Houston Cougars came calling.

The gift that arrived was a ladder. And it was not a stepladder either, it was one that you’d use to cut down nets.

His former Athletic Director at the University of Oklahoma, Joe Castiglione, sent the ladder and it contained significance far beyond using it to cut down the nets. He was the type of ladder people we all need. 

The ladder was symbolic.

It was a symbol of remembering all of the people whose hands have been on that ladder and put him in a position for success.

“There’s a lot of hands-on that ladder” explained Joe Castiglione. Of course, the players, but also the secretaries, janitors, team managers, equipment managers, director of basketball operations, graduate assistants, coaches’ wives, alumni, and administrators all contributed.

It was used as well when Houston Cougars cut down the nets after they won their first conference championship in 27 years.

The ladder people in our lives are those who can help us get to where we want to go! Who are you providing the ladder for in their lives and whose are you using? Many people continue to contribute to your success. If you’re not getting the results that you want, however, who is coaching you? 

Will you be The Hinge For others?

 


dr rob bell speakerDr. Rob Bell is a Sport Psychology Coach. His company DRB & associates coach executives and professional athletes and is based in Indianapolis. Some clients have included three winners on the PGA Tour, Indy Eleven, University of Notre Dame, Marriott, and Walgreens. 

Please Check out all the books and the mental toughness podcast - 15 Minutes of Mental Toughness as we interview expert athletes and coaches about Mental Strength and their Hinge Moment. New blog posts are published weekly. 

5 Types of People Who Can Help You


The 5 Types of People Who Can Help You Build Mental Toughness


Challenges are an inescapable and necessary part of the road to success, which is why it is imperative to build mental toughness needed to overcome them.

No one gets there alone, so you’ll need the support of the following people to grow.

One of the best ways to become mentally tough is by surrounding yourself with the 5 kinds of people who can help you build Mental Toughness. 


1. A person that is accomplished 
2. An individual who doubts you. 
3. Someone that guides you. 
4. Anyone that criticizes you. 
5. Another person with self-discipline. 

1. A Person That is Accomplished

Not only is it important to have goals , but also have people that have achieved
success. Researchers from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a connection between strong cognitive performances and social influence.

In their study, they learned that the people who performed well were positively influenced by group
leaders.

Learning from others’ success will help apply the right attitude to your own
journey, as they can help you mentally prepare for potential obstacles along the way.

2. An Individual Who Doubts You

In contrast to someone that inspires, there also needs to be someone which makes you doubt
your dreams and your ability to achieve them.

Why? 

As previously shared in We All Need This Type Of Person In Our Life, a person who doesn’t believe in you will make you have more confidence in yourself when deciding to let it be an inspiration.

It’s not about proving that person wrong, but showing yourself and others that you are right! 

3. Someone That Guides You

In your leadership journey, it’s ideal to find someone who can guide by striking that balance
between showing the way and challenging youMaryville University highlights the
importance of mentors that one can confide and consult with to build the skills needed to be a
success.

This is especially crucial for learning how to manage teams and confronting change, as
these are skills that we can’t exactly learn from a book.

A mentor can serve as your thermostat for what it means to be a good leader and how to develop your mental toughness. This is just one of the 5 types of people who can help you build Mental Toughness. 

4. Anyone Who Criticizes You

It’s vital to have a critic in your life as well.

EVERYONE who has reached levels of success and significance has had this person who criticized them! We may be familiar with this person — the one who is quick to announce that you’re wrong, the one who finds fault in all you do, and the one who simply wants to tear others down. Some people seriously get off on that stuff! 

Every wonder why Forrest Gump Started Running? 

Although this is a negative person, being in their presence can help cultivate a stronger sense of self-control, and can help be mindful of the effects of your decisions.

This person reminds us that you’re in charge of your emotions and actions.

5. Another Person With Self-Discipline

Acquiring mental toughness requires a lot of self-discipline, as we’ll encounter trials and tribulations — which will eventually lead to triumphs — along the way. One of the 5 types of people who can help you is a person with self-discipline. 

A study shared by the Huffington Post found that being around self-disciplined people can help strengthen your own willpower.

Having this type of person in your life will not only enhance mental toughness but also make someone more motivated to achieve their goals.


Written by Celene Ashleigh—Tech enthusiast. Gamer. Blogger. Music Lover. Always updated with the latest upbeat trends in social media, gadgets, game releases and chic fashion.